Prime Minister Trudeau Apologizes for Discrimination Against Members of LGBTQ2 Community

An official apology from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to members of the LGBTQ2 community was made in the House of Commons Tuesday.

An official apology from Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to members of the LGBTQ2 community was made in the House of Commons Tuesday. For four decades, during the Cold War era, thousands of federal employees were fired because of their sexuality in what's known as the "gay purge." Advocates of the time believed their sexuality was a "weakness" or a "character flaw" that could be used against them in the form of blackmail by the Soviet Union. Trudeau says careers were sidelined or ended and it was wrong. He told the House "the number one job of any government is to keep its citizens safe. And on this, we have failed LGBTQ2 people, time and time again. It is with shame and sorrow and deep regret for the things we have done that I stand here today and say: We were wrong. We apologize. I am sorry. We are sorry." The federal government has promised $100-million to compensate members of the Canadian military and other federal agencies who were affected by the discrimination. It has also tabled legislation which, if passed, would allow people convicted of consensual sex with same-sex partners to have their criminal records expunged. -Tina Giesbrecht
 
Justin Trudeau
 

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